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Money Talks

The show about you and your money.

Money Talks focuses on personal finance as it applies to Mississippians. In any given week, we’ll talk about anything from preparing your taxes to saving for college or investing in the stock market. Our experts are Dr. ... More
Latest Episode
2019-6-18

Money Talks: June Open Topic

What should you buy and what should you stay away from this month? How do you find cheap gas?


https://www.dealnews.com/features/discounts/months/June/ suggests: Spring clothes, family movies, lingerie, gym memberships, local fruit and veggies BUT NOT Amazon products, laptops, grills, or patio furniture.


Ryder Taff and Nancy Lottreidge-Anderson took calls concerning medical bills, rolling over pensions, car buying, long-term care insurance and nursing home insurance.

2019-6-18

Money Talks: June Open Topic

What should you buy and what should you stay away from this month? How do you find cheap gas?


https://www.dealnews.com/features/discounts/months/June/ suggests: Spring clothes, family movies, lingerie, gym memberships, local fruit and veggies BUT NOT Amazon products, laptops, grills, or patio furniture.


Ryder Taff and Nancy Lottreidge-Anderson took calls concerning medical bills, rolling over pensions, car buying, long-term care insurance and nursing home insurance.

2019-6-11

Money Talks: Refinancing Mortgages

Guest: Adam Black, mortgage broker from Renasant Bank https://ablack-renasantbank.mortgagewebcenter.com/


The show discussed current interest rates, costs to refinance, and how to decide if you would benefit from refinancing your mortgage. Did you know most mortgages are originated by online, non depository lenders?


Calls talked about home equity loans, reverse mortgages, and cash out mortgages.


2019-6-4

Money Talks: Emergency Financial First Aid Kit

We would like to remind you: when disasters strike our state you can tune in to MPB for statewide coverage:



Biloxi at 90.3; Bude at 88.9;

Jackson at 91.3; Meridian at 88.1;

Greenwood at 90.9; Starkville at 89.9

Booneville at 89.5; Oxford at 90.3



  • The Atlantic Hurricane season, which affects Mississippi and all of the Gulf Coast began on June 1st and runs through November 30th. The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency suggests that in addition to:
  • Flashlight and battery-powered radio with additional batteries.
  • Canned and non-perishable food.
  • Bottled water.
  • Toiletry items.
  • Pet food and pet supplies.
  • Medicine and prescription medication.

You need Copies of important family papers and documents and CASH. Money Talks suggests you print the FEMA Emergency Financial First Aid Kit and fill out the worksheets so you’re ready for an evacuation or a disaster. https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1524144185649-5dd9736e7ff89b5997182396f4e13fee/Emergency_Financial_First_Aid_Kit_(EFFAK)_signed_04.09.18_508.pdf


The Federal Emergency Management Agency suggests 4 simple steps to financial preparedness

  1. Assess and compile: gather your important document and contacts.
  2. Review your insurance policies and financial paperwork to be sure that they are still accurate and current.
  3. Safeguard your paper and electronic copies of your files.
  4. Update or revisit your financial first aid kit often, especially when you have life changes.


Having Household information with you during a disaster can help you to:

  • Prove the identity of all household members
  • Maintain contact with your extended family
  • Maintain contact with your employer
  • Apply for FEMA disaster assistance.


Some of the household identification you need to gather include:

  • Copies of driver’s license
  • Birth certificates, adoption papers, child custody documents
  • Marriage or divorce documents
  • Military and pet records


Another section of the Emergency Financial First Aid Kit we’re discussing today is the Financial and Legal Documentation part. This includes information about:

  • Housing payments
  • Utility or debt payments
  • Lists of banks, retirement accounts
  • Insurance policies
  • Frequent flier or reward accounts
  • Powers of attorney or will / trust info


They have a section for Household contacts.

The kit has suggestions for protecting your identity, keeping your electronic records safe.

Their tips on passwords and PINS include:

  • Select something that is memorable but not that is public information about yourself
  • Don’t use the same password for more than one account
  • NEVER give out your password or PIN for any reason, no matter whom the person is or claims to be.


http://Ready.gov is a website that can help you prepare for different types of emergencies. The FEMA website has information about: Thunderstorms & Lightning, Extreme Heat, Power Outages, an Active Shooter, and how to Get Involved with your community.

There is a FEMA app

We’re talking about being financially prepared in the event of a disaster, but the Mississippi Emergency Recovery Agency has information about preparing for Hurricanes, Tornadoes, Earthquakes, Radiological, Floods, Winter Weather, and Disaster Kits at http://msema.org

2019-5-7

Money Talks: Spring Cleaning

You've got 11 months before the next tax day. What can you do to make it easier on yourself?




How long do you need to keep what paper? It's time for Financial Spring Cleaning. Listen to the show to learn what you should do about your retirement accounts, insurance, beneficiary information, debts, and automated payments.

It's time to evaluate your tax withholding, charitable giving, and scheduled medical procedures. Keep good records for yourself and your family for emergencies, disasters, or in case of death. 

  • Keep Sales Receipts until warranty expires or can no longer return or exchange
  • What to keep for 1 month:  ATM Printouts (When you balance your checkbook each month throw out the ATM receipts)
  • What to keep for 1 year:
  • Paycheck Stubs
  • Utility Bills
  • Cancelled Checks
  • Credit Card Receipts
  • Bank Statements
  • Quarterly Investment Statements
  • What to keep for 3 years
  • Income Tax Returns (Please keep in mind that you can be audited by the IRS for no reason up to three years after you filed a tax return. If you omit 25% of your gross income that goes up to 6 years and if you don't file a tax return at all, there is no statute of limitations.)
  • Medical Bills and Cancelled Insurance Policies
  • Records of Selling a House
  • Records of Selling a Stock
  • Receipts, Cancelled Checks and other Documents that Support Income or a Deduction on your Tax Return
  • Annual Investment Statement
  • What to keep for 7 years:  Records of Satisfied Loans
  • What to hold while active:
  • Contracts
  • Insurance Documents
  • Stock Certificates
  • Property Records
  • Stock Records
  • Records of Pensions and Retirement Plans
  • Property Tax Records Disputed Bills
  • Home Improvement Records
  • Keep Forever
  • Marriage Licenses
  • Birth Certificates
  • Wills
  • Adoption Papers
  • Death Certificates
  • Records of Paid Mortgages

*These documents should be kept in a very safe place, like a safety deposit box.